Biomass Energy Training Curriculum – TN

Bioenergy Curriculum graphic
 
This curriculum  provides training on biomass energy to extension agents and local officials so that they may deliver this information to their stakeholders. While it is written as a training guide for TN, much of the information is applicable throughout the Southeastern US region.
 

This curriculum was developed through a Southern SARE grant and collaboration between Tennessee State University, the University of Tennessee, eXtension.org, and USDA-Rural Development. 

 

Link to the full TN Biomass Energy Training Curriculum (a 254 page downloadable

Biofuel Feedstocks

Bioenergy Curriculum graphic

This Biofuel Feedstocks module is part of the Biomass Energy Training Curriculum, 13 modules developed through a Southern SARE grant and collaboration between Tennessee State University, the University of Tennessee, eXtension.org, and USDA-Rural Development. While it is written as a training guide for TN producers, much of the information is applicable throughout the Southeastern US region.

The objective of this curriculum is to provide training on biomass energy to extension agents and local officials so that they may deliver

Introduction to Processing Feedstocks into Biofuels

Processing Biodiesel
From feedstock to fuel. Photos: D.Ciolkosz, M.Szala, Biodiesel Ed at U Idah. CC license

Biomass is transformed into solid & liquid fuels, gas, electricity and heat using a variety of processing methods and equipment.

TOPICS

Introduction

One of the main barriers to a successful biomass energy industry is the simple fact that most raw biomass is not immediately useful as an …

Current USDA NIFA AFRI CAPs

USDA-NIFA (National Institute for Food and Agriculture) currently funds 7 bioenergy Coordinated Agricultural Projects (CAPs) through Agricultural and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) Grants. 

AFRI CAPs 2015
AFRI CAP Biofuel Feedstocks and Project Locations

Explore the NIFA Bioenergy CAPs:


Advanced Hardwood Biofuels Northwest (AHB)
Lead Institute:  University of Washington
Awarded:  2011
Feedstock:  Purpose grown woody crops (e.g. poplar)
Conversion platform target: Hybrid bio/thermochemical conversion
Industrial Partners: ZeaChem Inc.


Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance (NARA)
Lead Institute:  Washington State University
Awarded:  2011
Feedstock: Forestry residuals
Conversion

Justin Heavey, State University of New York

Justin Heavey is a senior research support specialist for the Willow Project at the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY-ESF) in Syracuse, New York. Since 2008, he has been managing energy and sustainability projects in higher education.
 
In his present work, Justin helps landowners and other stakeholders who grow, use, or are simply interested in bioenergy crops. The expanding willow bioenergy industry in New York State and the Northeast benefits from his technical and

Size of ground biomass particles is significant logistically

by Oladiran Fasin

As part of preparing biomass for conversion into biofuels, biomass is ground through mills such as a hammer mill (Figure 1) or a knife mill. The ground biomass particles are then fed into conversion vessels and/or stored in hoppers that are often attached to storage vessels (Figure 2). Creating a steady flow of the biomass particles out of the hopper is a significant issue for processing and conversion. Often, biomass flow from storage containers will be disrupted …

Technological Processes: Thermochemical

Introduction

Woody biomass is converted into useful forms of energy (i.e. solid, liquid, or gaseous fuels) as well as useful products (e.g. polymers, bio-plastics, char, pellets, and acids) using a number of technological processes. Thermochemical processes depend on the relationship between heat and chemical action as a means of extracting and creating products and energy. This fact sheet briefly covers some of the more important thermochemical conversion and production processes used for obtaining bio-based energy and products from woody biomass.…

Why is there such an emphasis on power production from biomass?

Woody biomass is an abundant and readily available resource that historically has not been used much except by forest products manufacturers as an internal energy source at their facilities, although many such manufacturers have also been able to produce excess electric power for sale to the grid. Whereas commercial-scale production of transportation fuels is still in early stages of development, technologies are already well-developed for producing heat and electricity from biomass in firing or co-firing in boilers and in gasification …

What are the differences between biofuels, biopower, and bioproducts?

These terms refer to three generally different end uses of biomass based products. “Biofuel” is short for “biomass fuel,” a term used for liquid fuels produced from biomass (generally transportation fuels), such as ethanol, bio-oil, and biodiesel. “Biopower” refers to biomass-fueled power systems that generate electricity or industrial process heat and steam, such as combined heat and power (CHP) systems. “Bioproduct” is short for “biomass products” and can be used to describe a chemical, material, or other (non-energy) product such …